For Strategic Impact: Donor Advised and Scholarship Funds

The Community Foundation for Mississippi works with donors to simplify and streamline their charitable giving through personal giving accounts such as donor advised and scholarship/award funds. By allowing donors to centralize their gifts and recommend grants at any time, we make giving easy, allowing donors to focus on the impact they are making with the causes they care about. 

These types of funds also allow the holders to leave a legacy by continuing charitable giving beyond one’s lifetime. Other fund holders may choose to honor the memory of a loved one by focusing on philanthropic grantmaking that reflects their values. 

Here are just a few stories of those working through CFM to connect legacy to generosity. 

Field of hay bales.

Jones Charitable Family Fund

Even before contacting CFM, the Jones family made philanthropy a part of their daily lives. When a farm was sold, creating a donor advised fund was the perfect way to realize a capital gains tax benefit and continue to support nonprofits making their communities a better place through fund grantmaking. Fundholder Bryan Jones said it was a “win, win.” When making decisions about capital gains, donor-advised funds are a perfect way to earn a tax benefit and impact the community.

Image of Blake Coghlan with field behind him.

Blake Coghlan Ag Scholarship Fund

At 19 years old, Blake Coghlan had dreams of building the best farm in the Delta. A native of Holly Bluff, Mississippi, born to a fourth generation Mississippi farm family, he was a promising young farmer. Tragically, in an unfortunate accident, Blake lost his life. The Blake Coghlan Memorial Ag Scholarship was established at the Community Foundation for Mississippi to provide financial assistance to a graduating high school senior from Yazoo County or Sharkey County intending to study Agriculture or Agriculture-related degree at a Mississippi 4-year or 2-year institution.

A group stands together in the gym at Murrah High School during an awards ceremony. Two of the students hold up enlarged checks with their names on them for $5,000.

Leland R. Speed Scholarship for Top Cadets

Established by William VanDevender, a CFM donor with a donor advised fund, the scholarship and fund at the Community Foundation for Mississippi honors the late Leland R. Speed, a Jackson leader who served his state and country. The scholarship is awarded each year for the Jackson Public Schools JROTC Overall Top Cadet and the Murrah High School JROTC Top Cadet. The family was inspired by Speed’s passion for higher education and his appreciation for the JROTC program’s ability to produce the best and brightest candidates.

COF Names Alexander to Community Foundation Advisory Group

Congratulations to Jane Alexander, President and CEO of the Community Foundation for Mississippi, for recently being named to the Council on Foundation’s Community Foundation Advisory Group! The group assists the Council with strategic decisions related to the community foundation field, represents the interests of their peers across the country and elevates the issues of most importance to the sector. This year’s advisory group will be co-chaired by Kristi Knous, President of the Community Foundation of Greater Des Moines, and Heather Peeler, President and CEO of ACT for Alexandria.

“The Council on Foundations has always provided great leadership in philanthropy and this new advisory group shows that its commitment to excellence will touch communities small and large, across the country,” said Alexander. “I am thrilled to be working with colleagues under the leadership of Kristi and Heather.”

The cohort provides a new mechanism for community foundation leaders to collaboratively influence the Council’s programs, resources, and services for community foundations, which represent the largest segment of Council membership.

“The rigorous selection process for this group fielded nearly 50 applications of extraordinary quality for a final cohort of 15 leaders,” said Kathleen Enright, Council on Foundations President & CEO, to members this week. “We were intentional in our selection process to ensure broad representation across multiple dimensions of diversity and to establish a group that embodies the many ways in which community foundations and communities served are different.”

This group will also assist the Council on important work, such as ensuring an equitable approach to the design of community philanthropy work, including the 2023 Leading Locally: The Power of Place-Based and Community Philanthropy conference.

See a full list of the advisory group members and learn more about their work here.

For Building Capacity: National Partnerships

The Community Foundation for Mississippi is not only committed to the long-term sustainability of nonprofits, but also work with national partners to contribute to positive systemic change in our state. To see societal outcomes truly shift, we must do the work to know our communities, to bring together thought partners, to listen to community needs and to adapt solutions that work. 

Some of CFM’s long term investments include working with statewide and national partners to support the transformation of early childhood education, re-think access to trusted local media and coach local neighborhoods to build their own capacity to become co-creators of local change.

A group sits around tables in discussion.

Harwood Institute for Public Innovation

Community foundations have a unique commitment to place-based improvements, supporting work that amplifies the voices of residents and encourages community-led solutions. For a second year, CFM, with the Harwood Institute for Public Innovation, offered expert coaching and civic engagement training to community leaders across Jackson, empowering residents and neighborhood leaders to change their narrative, to raise their voices, to provide solutions and to join a collective effort for meaningful change in the capital city.

A person holds several microphones, a recorder and a notepad.

Microsoft

Over the past few years, the world has seen an increased need for local, trusted media sources. In 2020, CFM was chosen as one of six pilot programs to lead an effort to examine improvements that can be made to provide journalists and newsrooms with the tools, technology and capacity they need to expand their impact and to tell stories in new ways. Through this initiative, CFM has worked with its partners to create a collaborative effort among news sources across Mississippi to share expertise and experiences, to increase access to reliable information and, ultimately, to strengthen the backbone of democracy in Mississippi communities.

An african american student in a yellow dress laughs brightly behind a colored abacus in an elementary school

W.K. Kellogg Foundation

Through our long-term partnership with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, CFM is working to transform early childhood education throughout Mississippi. CFM accomplishes this work by supporting leaders in early education as they work together to assess the needs and potential barriers that exist for parents, students and educators across the state. Efforts include increasing data-driven solutions and collaborations, increasing education access to under-resourced populations and supporting a holistic approach to enhancing outcomes for all of Mississippi’s children.

Community Foundation for Mississippi, Atmos Energy and Jackson Public Schools Announce Gifts to Support Water Crisis Response

(Left to right) Brent Bailey, Mississippi Public Service Commissioner, Central District; Wendy Collins, Atmos Energy; Matt Davidson, Atmos Energy, Mississippi Division President; Jane Alexander, Community Foundation for Mississippi President and CEO; Dr. Errick Greene, JPS Superintendent; Thea Faulkner, Partners in Education.
(Left to right) Brent Bailey, Mississippi Public Service Commissioner, Central District; Wendy Collins, Atmos Energy; Matt Davidson, Atmos Energy, Mississippi Division President; Jane Alexander, Community Foundation for Mississippi President and CEO; Dr. Errick Greene, JPS Superintendent; Thea Faulkner, Partners in Education.

As the City of Jackson and its surrounding communities continue to recover from the recent water crisis, Atmos Energy has announced support for ongoing relief efforts by making a $25,000 contribution to the Community Foundation for Mississippi (CFM) for Jackson Public Schools (JPS) through the Foundation’s JPS Response Fund. Atmos Energy is also making a $25,000 contribution to the Helping Friends and Neighbors Fund (Disaster Response Fund) at CFM to support nonprofits.

“The immediate crisis is over but there is a lot of work to do in the Jackson area before everything gets back to normal. Hopefully, this donation will help Jackson Public Schools and our young people get back on a regular learning path,” said Matt Davidson, President of the Mississippi Division of Atmos Energy. “We are so fortunate to have the Community Foundation for Mississippi as a partner to ensure our donation funds make the most impact.”

CFM connects donors, communities, and non-profit organizations to make meaningful and lasting change. Atmos Energy is contributing $50,000 in total to CFM’s Disaster Relief Fund and JPS Response Fund. Half of that donation will help JPS address needs for challenges declared by disasters and emergencies, including water issues. The other half will support the Hub for the Hungry program through the Helping Friends and Neighbors Fund at CFM, which unites Mississippi nonprofit agencies with food distribution companies and local farmers, powered by Good Samaritan Center and Extra Table.

“We are so grateful for Atmos Energy’s unbelievably kind donation,” said Jane Alexander, Community Foundation for Mississippi President and CEO. “The Disaster Relief Fund was created to enhance disaster responses because donations to the fund can easily adapt to current needs at hand, whether that is food, medical supplies, shelter or something completely unforeseen. A donation to this fund will aid in the long-term effort to make our city whole after this crisis.”

JPS Superintendent Dr. Errick Greene says the JPS Response Fund at CFM and Atmos Energy’s donation will help the district bridge gaps during times of need. “We are extremely grateful for Atmos Energy’s support of the Jackson community’s ongoing relief efforts,” Greene said. “The water crisis has created hardship for many JPS scholars and their families, and this support will help to bring greater stability to their lives. With all the challenges that our communities have faced, it’s wonderful to have partners like Atmos Energy to help us remain focused on the work of teaching and learning.”

Central District Public Service Commissioner Brent Bailey also joined Thursday, expressing his support for the partnership. “I am proud to join Atmos Energy and the Community Foundation for Mississippi for this announcement of generous contributions that will help provide crucial assistance in Jackson following the most recent water crisis,” Central District Public Service Commissioner Brent Bailey said. “We are grateful for the ongoing efforts of Atmos Energy, as they continue to be vested and supportive in many partnerships that make a beneficial impact on communities in our capital city and statewide.”

The Foundation is also challenging others to help support the Helping Friends and Neighbors Fund (Disaster Response Fund) with a $25,000 challenge match. CFM’s Community Trust Fund will match $25,000 in gifts to help increase the available pool to support mid and long-term solutions related to the Jackson water crisis.

CFM recently launched the Nonprofit Rapid Response Mini-Grant to reimburse 501c3 nonprofits in the Jackson area who have been directly affected by the Jackson water crisis. Grants will reimburse expenses related to the water crisis, which began July 29, 2022, for increased demand for, or increased supply of drinkable water. Expenses should be unplanned, un-budgeted expenses (related to water needs) related to charitable service by nonprofits from July 29 – September 15, 2022. Reimbursements may range from $200-$2,000. Funding for this grant is made possible by the Helping Friends and Neighbors Fund. The deadline to apply is Wednesday, October 12, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. Awards will be announced in early November.

To learn more about CFM’s impact during the Jackson water crisis and how to apply for the Nonprofit Rapid Response Mini-Grant, visit formississippi.org.

CFM Partners with GHHI for Water Filtration Solution-Building

Three women stand around a table. The one in the middle demos a countertop water filtration system.
(Left to right) Melody Moody Thortis, CFM Director of Strategic Impact; Catherine Lee, Director of Client Services at GHHI; and Jane Alexander, CFM President and CEO look at a model of the countertop Zero water filter that will be used during the program. Lee shows the group how to use the included TDS meter to check the levels of dissolved solids before and after filtering tap water to show there is nothing left behind but the purest water.

While the boil water notice and immediate water crisis have ended in Jackson, the question remains for many, “Is my water safe to drink?” For women – especially those of childbearing age and expectant mothers – and children, the threat of lead in water is of increased importance.

During the Jackson water crisis, the Community Foundation for Mississippi immediately identified water filtration as a gap and barrier to health outcomes for citizens of Jackson. CFM is partnering with Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) to distribute countertop Zero water filtration systems and teach households about methods of water boiling and filtering commonly recommended by the City of Jackson. This programming will not only reduce potential exposure to unsafe drinking water but will also reduce the cost burden of purchasing drinking water for low-income households in Jackson and plastic water bottle waste.

“The Community Foundation for Mississippi recognizes that the work to resolve Jackson’s water crisis is a long-term investment that requires strategic mitigation efforts and partnering with leaders across sectors to imagine the possibilities for change. Our commitment to be “for Mississippi, for good, forever” allows us to invest in long-term systems change, build social capital and work with community leaders to identify and address critical issues for the sustainability and livability of the communities we serve throughout central and southwest Mississippi,” said Melody Moody Thortis, CFM’s Director of Strategic Impact. “We are so happy to launch this partnership with GHHI and to support efforts to work directly with Jackson’s most vulnerable populations, providing hands-on solutions and on-going education for increased access to clean and drinkable water at home.”

The Zero water filtration systems are certified to reduce heavy metals and PFAs, including lead, and include a testing meter to test for particles in the water. After learning about safe particle levels during a home visit, residents will be able to test their water before and after filtration to ensure their water is properly filtered. Each household will receive one dispenser and a pack of replacement filters to last up to one year on average. This investment will save families hundreds of dollars a year compared to expenses of direct purchasing of bottled water, as well as costs incurred in times of crises when residents spend significant amounts of time and travel costs to find available water. With the filter, residents will be able to boil water at home, cool it to room temperature and filter it for any contaminants – all at home.

Graphic of the five stages of filtration for a Zero water filter.“Through discussions with families engaged in GHHI programs we have learned it is very common, especially for families living in central, west and south Jackson, to not drink tap water and spend significant amounts of their monthly income to purchase bottled drinking water,” said Catherine Lee, AICP, Director of Client Services for GHHI in Jackson. “As water crises persist these practices will contribute to inequitable cost burdens for low-income households unless families can access alternative resources for water filtration and get more information about how to address water safety within their households.”

GHHI currently provides assistance to households applying for the Lead Safe Jackson Program, a program administered by the City of Jackson Office of Housing and Community Development, which provides lead risk assessments and repairs for lead paint hazard control. To be eligible households must have low-to-moderate incomes as defined by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and include family members who are at risk of lead poisoning (children under the age of 6 or pregnant women), and their homes must be built before 1978 when lead-based paint was banned for residential use.

The Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) is a 501(c)3 organization and is the nation’s largest organization dedicated to advancing racial and health equity through healthy homes. The Jackson GHHI site, established in 2015, works across sectors to support improvements in housing, coordinate and improve service delivery and provide direct services to improve environmental health in housing. GHHI is dedicated to addressing the social determinants of health and the advancement of racial and health equity through the creation of healthy, safe and energy efficient homes. By delivering a standard of excellence in its work, GHHI aims to eradicate the negative health impacts of unhealthy housing and unjust policies for children, seniors and families to ensure better health, economic and social outcomes for low-income communities of color.

For Helping Others: CFM + Nonprofits

The Community Foundation for Mississippi celebrates the work of the state’s nonprofit sector by providing opportunities for its growth and sustainability. By enabling organizations to grow their vision, increase their financial resources and expand their long-term reach, CFM provides a valuable resource that can ultimately lead to increased nonprofit capacity both now and forever. 

Over the past year, nonprofits have started to consider what is next in a post-COVID world, particularly when benefits of endowments are more important than ever to ensure longevity. 

Here are a few nonprofits who began turning the page by working alongside CFM to create funds that will lead to their success for many years to come. 

A crowd cheers to the camera, all wearing green.

Hal’s St. Paddy’s Day Parade

Central Mississippi’s annual celebration of spring began as a way to bring people together to celebrate the unique flavor of Mississippi’s capital city. Over the past 30 years, the parade has grown into a weekend-long festival bringing over 70,000 people to downtown Jackson and organizers are passionate about keeping it going. In 2021, support from the John F. and Lucy Shackelford Fund at CFM provided crucial supplies needed for parade safety and led to the creation of the Hal’s St. Paddy’s Day Parade Fund to ensure that the event can continue to add to Jackson’s cultural landscape long into the future.

A crowd releases balloons in front of the new Magnolia Speech School.

Magnolia Speech School

Magnolia Speech School understands that all children need a voice. The school provides resources, early intervention and a nurturing community to provide and connect children and families to the tools they need to reach their full potential through listening and spoken language.  Known as a national pioneer for their work with sensory integration and classroom instruction for children with speech and language disorders, Magnolia Speech School worked with CFM to create an endowment fund that would allow them to grow and to build a long-lasting foundation to continue their work.

A ground of children sit at a high top table with Macbook laptops while an adult looks on, giving instructions at Operating Shoestring.

Operation Shoestring

At the core of Operation Shoestring’s mission is investing in the future of children — in their schools, their families and their community. By providing year-round academic, social and emotional support to children alongside support for their families, Operation Shoestring is transforming communities. By investing in their own future through an endowment fund at the Community Foundation for Mississippi, they will be able to make a long-term impact in the lives of children and families in central Mississippi. 

Grant Opportunity: CFM Nonprofit Rapid Response Mini-Grant

Are you a nonprofit that was affected by the Jackson water crisis?

The Community Foundation for Mississippi’s Nonprofit Rapid Response Mini-Grant is a reimbursement program for 501c3 nonprofits residing in the Jackson area who have been directly affected by the Jackson water crisis. Grants will reimburse expenses related to the water crisis, which began July 29, 2022, for increased demand for, or increased supply of drinkable water. Expenses should be unplanned, un-budgeted expenses (related to water needs) related to charitable service by nonprofits from July 29 – September 15, 2022. Reimbursements may range from $200-$2,000.

The deadline to apply is Wednesday, October 12, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. Awards will be announced in early November.

Eligible organizations and expenses:

• All eligible nonprofits must be based in the City of Jackson or served by the Jackson municipal water system, including Byram, who were affected by the boil water notice and subsequent system failure.

• Reimbursements must replace past expenditures and past expenses should NOT have been paid by another grant source.

• Grant awards should be targeted to needs expended related to the Jackson water crisis.

Applicants will be asked about their additional needs and solutions related to the water crisis however, this round of funding is only related to water and ice-specific needs. Eligible reimbursements include documented ice and water expenses.

For Feeding Others: CFM + Food Insecurity

With one of the highest food insecurity rates in the nation, Mississippi has over 450,000 households without daily reliable access to affordable and nutritious food. The onset of COVID-19 caused this need to intensify, leaving many wondering how they might feed themselves and their families during the pandemic. 

CFM’s deep connections with the communities we serve allowed us to respond quickly and to work in tandem with community foundations across the state and the Mississippi State Legislature to serve nonprofits and food pantries across the state. CFM was able to administer more than $2.4 million in CARES Act funds to provide access to food and capacity to nonprofits providing services across central and southwest Mississippi. These reimbursement grants helped nonprofits who faced decreased revenue and vastly increased demand during the pandemic.

Mississippi has a history of coming together during disasters to help one another and COVID-19 was no exception. See how the community came together with CFM to find new ways to bring food to those most in need. 

Image of canned goods.

We Care Mission

Scott County

When We Care Mission’s thrift store closed for four months at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the nonprofit’s income immediately dried up for its much-needed food pantry in Morton. We Care Mission was able to think creatively to re-open partially outside, but times were still tight. Connecting with CFM and CARES Act funding, We Care Mission was able to continue operations and supplement their food assistance to help many fellow community members also impacted by COVID-19.

Mississippi Center for Police and Sherriffs

Hinds County

Sheltering in place took on new meaning at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic for shelters around the country, including Joyce’s Hope Home, operated by the Mississippi Center for Police and Sheriffs. Hope Home, which provides emergency shelter care for homeless women and children, suddenly was over capacity and the need for their Friday morning food distributions to families in distress was increasing. CFM was able to administer CARES Act funds that helped sustain operations and connect families in crisis to much needed resources.

Arise and Shine

Copiah County

Arise and Shine leapt to action to adapt its programming to meet the needs that arose due to COVID-19. By converting a former Fred’s Dollar Store into a learning center, food pantry and food distribution center, they were able to provide educational services and daily food distributions to children, families and the elderly in Crystal Springs and Copiah County. This adjustment meant an increase in costs due to the expansion of space, food costs, sanitation, staff support and technology needed. CARES funds distributed through CFM allowed the organization to off-set costs allowing them to better meet the needs of those they serve. 

Learn more about Community Foundation for Mississippi’s impact in our 2022 Annual Report.

Bill Hunsberger Scholarship at CFM Announces 2022 Recipient Mia Robertson

Mia Robertson
Mia Robertson

The Community Foundation for Mississippi is proud to announce the 2022 recipient of the Bill Hunsberger Scholarship is Mia Robertson of Starkville. Mia Robertson is a Senior Presidential-Endowed Scholar and John C. Stennis Scholar majoring in Political Science and Philosophy with minors in Pre-Law and International Relations at Mississippi State.

The Bill Hunsberger Scholarship Fund at the Community Foundation for Mississippi honors Bill Hunsberger, publisher of The Clarion-Ledger newspaper and a board member of the Community Foundation for Mississippi, who died suddenly of a heart attack in 2004. In his honor, his family and friends established the Bill Hunsberger Scholarship Fund at CFM, which provides scholarships to students studying the programs at the universities attended by his three daughters. Eligibility includes full-time female students entering her junior or senior year of undergraduate study. Awards are rotated annually between a journalism major at the University of Southern Mississippi, a journalism major at the University of Mississippi and a political science major at Mississippi State University with media involvement.

Currently, Mia works as a law clerk at Winfield Law Firm, a civil practice with a focus in chancery matters. Her passion for criminal justice has also led her to work as a legal intern with The Mississippi Bail Project, Fredericksburg Office of the Public Defender and New Orleans Office of the Public Defender. Mia also previously served as a Speech and Debate Program Assistant for the Stennis Center for Public Service and used this position to expand access to speech and debate to underserved school districts. At the Stennis Center, Mia also worked as the Junior Editor of the Public Service Review, a quarterly journal highlighting the contributions of young public servants.

Mia is the Founder and President of BARS, an MSU student organization dedicated to service and activism on behalf of the incarcerated. In the MSU Student Association, Mia serves as a Justice on the Judicial Council and previously served for two years as the Director of Community and Governmental Relations where she coordinated voter registration drives on MSU’s campus. Mia also serves as the President of the MSU Speech and Debate Council, a team she has participated in for four years. During her time on the collegiate Speech and Debate circuit, Mia has earned seven national championships in IPDA Debate, making her MSU’s first national champion in Speech and Debate. Mia is also a Regional Champion in Persuasive Speaking and Team IPDA Debate.

Ways to Help: Jackson Water Crisis

In July 2022, Jackson experienced increased rain and subsequent flooding of the Pearl River, impacting the city. This flooding exacerbated the city’s water issues, causing failures at the O.B. Curtis Water Treatment Plant. The City of Jackson and State of Mississippi, through the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency and Mississippi Department of Health, are working together under several states of emergency to address issues. On September 15, the boil water notice was lifted for the City of Jackson.

Below are ways to stay up-to-date on the water crisis and where to help support Jacksonians as we address ongoing issues with the City of Jackson water system. This page may be updated as information becomes available. (Last updated November 2, 2022)

Where can I find official information about the Jackson water?

The Mississippi Department of Health has a page for information for those on the Jackson water system.

The City of Jackson is posting frequent updates on its Facebook page, including frequent press conference live streams and water distribution sites. You can also visit their news page for daily news updates.

The Mississippi Emergency Management Agency has a webpage about the Jackson water crisis with daily incident command briefings.

If you are experiencing discolored water or no pressure, please alert the City of Jackson by using this online reporting tool.

Where can I support organizations who are helping address the water system (and long term solutions) in Jackson?

The Helping Friends and Neighbors Fund (Disaster Relief Fund) at the Community Foundation for Mississippi was created to respond to disasters in Mississippi, primarily in CFM’s coverage area of central and southwest Mississippi. It will not take the place of local relief efforts, but rather enhance disaster responses because of our community knowledge and connections, relief donations can easily adapt to current needs at hand, whether it’s food, medical supplies, shelter or something completely unforeseen. A donation to this fund will help wrap around needs related to Jackson’s water issues.

The JPS Response Fund at the Community Foundation for Mississippi has been established to offer financial assistance to the district and its schools for challenges caused by declared disasters, emergencies and Acts of God. This fund will help support the district address needs during this time of need.

Powered by the Good Samaritan Center and ExtraTable, the Hub for the Hungry program unites Mississippi nonprofit agencies with food distribution companies and local farmers. Current partners are KLLM Transport, Sysco Jackson, Two Dog Farms, Salad Days, and Central Mississippi Planning and Development. The Hub for the Hungry is assisting with water distribution beyond the water crisis for charitable organizations. Click below to learn more about the Hub for the Hungry.

Jackson Water Distribution Sites

Green icons represent water distribution sites. This map is not meant to catalog each individual site at churches and businesses.

The Mississippi Rapid Response Coalition is continuing to distribute water to Jackson residents. The current schedule is:

Tuesdays at 5 p.m.

South Jackson

Sykes Community Center

Strong Arms, 520 Sykes Road, Jackson, MS

Oak Forest Community Center

Operation Good, 2827 Oak Forest Dr., Jackson, MS

West Jackson

Westland Plaza Parking Lot

MS Poor People’s Campaign

 

Wednesdays at 5 p.m.

South Jackson

Oak Forest Community Center

Operation Good, 2827 Oak Forest Dr., Jackson, MS

West Jackson

Westland Plaza Parking Lot

MS Poor People’s Campaign

 

Thursdays at 5 p.m.

South Jackson

Oak Forest Community Center

Operation Good, 2827 Oak Forest Dr., Jackson, MS

West Jackson

Westland Plaza Parking Lot

MS Poor People’s Campaign

IAJE Community Center

IAJE, 406 W. Fortification St., Jackson, MS

 

Fridays at 5 p.m.

South Jackson

Oak Forest Community Center

Operation Good, 2827 Oak Forest Dr., Jackson, MS

West Jackson

Westland Plaza Parking Lot

MS Poor People’s Campaign

North Jackson

Northtown Pharmacy

JXN People’s Assembly, 6220 Old Canton Rd., Jackson, MS

 

Saturdays at 11 a.m.

Northwest Jackson

People’s Advocacy Institute

Northside Drive and Hanging Moss Road

West Jackson

IAJE Community Center

IAJE, 406 W. Fortification St., Jackson, MS

 

Sundays at 3 p.m.

North Jackson

MS Move Across from Tougaloo College

Operation Good

(Please note, these times and locations are subject to change. Before heading out, check the MRRC website for an up-to-date schedule.)

Want to recycle used water bottles?

Keep Jackson Beautiful and the Mississippi Urban League have teamed up with the city and Jackson Public School District to offer drop off sites at several water pickup locations to make it easier for residents to return the used bottles.

There are several locations in Jackson collecting water bottles. To find a dropoff site, Keep Jackson Beautiful says residents can download the Replenysh app and use its location-based service.

City of Jackson Water Status Tool

If you are experiencing discolored water or no pressure, please alert the City of Jackson by using this online reporting tool.

Information is subject to change. Know of other ways to support the City of Jackson? Send us an email at communications@formississippi.org.